All Squash

Tromboncino Squash

Tromboncino Squash

SQ794

C. moschata 70 days. This Italian summer squash is a wonderful diversion from the usual. The light green-to-tan fruit can grow up to 3 feet long and may be harvested anytime, from just a few inches through its full size. Enjoy Tromboncino's rich flavor steamed, grilled, or sliced raw in your favorite salad. A vining variety that is best trellised for straighter fruit.

   Open Pollinated
Approximately 8-9 seeds per gram.
  • SQ794/S
  • 3 grams
  • $3.05

  • SQ794/P
  • 7 grams
  • $5.15

  • SQ794/B
  • 1 oz
  • $9.95
  • More Information
  • Customer Reviews (4)
Soil Temp for Germ.Days to EmergenceSeed DepthThin Plants ToSeed SpacingRow SpacingMin. Germ.Seed LifeSeeds per gramFertilizer Needs
65-85°F5-101-1 1/2"1-2/hill3-4/hill6-10'75%3-4 yearsListed by typeMedium


Cucurbita spp. In the diverse family of squash are true nutritional powerhouses, encompassing a wide array of forms, flavors, colorations, and culinary applications. Squash are rich in the carotenoids necessary for vitamin A production and boast a wide complement of amino acids. While starchy, most of the carbohydrates in the fruit come from special polysaccharides, pectins, which have exhibited strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic, insulin-regulating properties.

Days to maturity are from date of direct seeding. If transplanting, subtract 10 days.

Culture
• Fertile well-drained soil gives best results
• Squash is a warm season crop, avoid planting too early; raised beds and plastic mulch help keep roots warm
• Squash are monoecious (bearing separate male and female flowers on the same plant) and require insect pollination
• Poor fruit set is often the result of inadequate pollination; plant bee attractant flowers

Direct Sowing
• Plant after frost danger when soil warms to 65°F
• Work in shovelful of compost and 1/2 cup TSC's Complete fertilizer into hill
• Keep soil evenly moist but not wet as too much moisture causes seed to rot
• Bush varieties: sow 3-4 feet apart
• Vining varieties: sow 4-5 feet apart

Transplanting
• Start indoors 3-4 weeks prior to anticipated transplant date in 4 inch pots
• Work in shovelful of compost and 1/2 cup TSC's Complete fertilizer into hill
• Transplant carefully as to not disturb roots

Insects & Diseases
Common insects: Spotted and striped cucumber beetles, vine borers and squash bugs
Insect control: Row covers and/or apply Pyrethrin
• Moschata species are resistant to vine borer
Common diseases: See chart below; diseases vary by region
Disease prevention: 3-4 year crop rotation, and fungicide applications

Harvest & Storage
Summer squash: Harvest regularly when fruits are young to keep plants productive
Winter squash: Leave on vine until fully mature, rinds should be firm
• When winter squash is mature cut stem leaving 2-4 inches remaining, gently wash in sanitizing solution, 10 parts water to 1 part bleach
• For best results move winter squash to a warm dry area 80-90°F to cure; see each type (below) for curing requirements
• Store winter squash at 50-60°F with 50-75% relative humidity with good air circulation

Curing Requirements
Acorn: Curing not required; Stores 2-3 months
Buttercup: Cure 10-14 days; Store 1-2 months for best flavor; Will keep 4-6 months
Butternut: Cure 10-14 days; Store 1-2 months for best flavor; Will keep 4-6 months
Delicata: Curing not required; Stores 2-3 months
Hubbard: Cure 10-14 days; Store 1-2 months for best flavor; Will keep 4-6 months
Mini-Hubbard: Curing not required; Stores 2-3 months
Spaghetti: Curing not required; Stores 2-3 months

Seeds per gram
Acorn, Butternut, & Delicata: 9-16
Buttercup, Hubbard, & Sweet Meat: 4-6
Green Summer: 8-9
Spaghetti: 4-7
Patty Pan: 7-10
Yellow Summer: 9-13
Zucchini: 5-8

KEY TO SQUASH DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
HR indicates high resistance.
IR indicates intermediate resistance.
CMV | Cucumber Mosaic Virus
PM | Powdery Mildew
PRV | Papaya Ringspot Virus
WMV* | Watermelon Mosaic Virus
ZYMV | Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus
* Numbers indicate specific disease race.
Overall Rating: Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Write a Review

Love this squash - won a blue ribbon!
Feb 16, 2016  |  By Mark Z
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The first year we grew this unique squash we trained a vine to a trellis and while the plant produced many squash we enjoyed, the star was one that grew with gravity's help from the top of the trellis and it got over 4 feet long. We entered it in the state fair and won a first prize for most unusual vegetable! People thought it looked like a sitar.
Ripped it out
Aug 22, 2013  |  By Charleen
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I grew this because a friend recommended it. Today I ripped it out. It is a huge vine, like a huge pumpkin; and the fruits are tasteless. Save space and plant real zucchini! If quantity is all you want, this is the variety you need. I think my friend was playing a joke on me. I am planning revenge!
olga
Jan 21, 2013  |  By Olga
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Love it. Was looking for something vine borers would avoid and this did the trick. Love it pickled as well.
Nice squash for PNW
Jul 15, 2012  |  By Bill N
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I grew this squash - under another name Trombetta di Abegna last year and it really produces a lot of fruit. Not as good for grilling as a regular zucchini but since all the seeds are in the ball on the end it is dense and solid - perfect for soups, steaming, etc. Vines get huge. We planted it again this year. I'd have bought the seed from TS if I had known they carry it.