Cucumbers - Organic

Wautoma Cucumbers

Wautoma Cucumbers

CU299

60 days. An early, very productive pickling cucumber, Wautoma is a consistent standout in our trials. Developed by the USDA, it produces huge crops of wonderful 4-5 inch picklers, often of better quality than the hybrids. Four to five foot plants resist nearly all cucumber diseases! Delightfully bitter-free and burpless, Wautoma has been tested for brining quality to ensure your pickling success. MO. A, ALS, CMV, DM, PM, S.

   Open Pollinated
Approximately 25-30 seeds per gram.
  • CU299/S
  • 1 gram
  • $3.95
  • More Information
  • Customer Reviews (2)
Seed DepthSeed SpacingSoil Temp for Germ.Days to Germ.Thin Plants To Approximately 25-30 seeds per gram.
1/2″4-6 per hill65-90°F4-131-2 per hill


Cucumis sativus A favorite in cuisine worldwide, cucumbers possess health benefits too numerous to mention. Incorporate cucumbers in your diet to aid with weight loss, as they are exceptionally low in calories (only about 8 calories in 1/2 cup), aid digestion, and rid toxins from the body. Among the more unusual qualities of the humble cuke is its ability to ease skin irritations. Use a piece of cucumber skin to soothe burns.
CULTURE: For the best yields, it is important to provide ideal growing conditions for cucumbers. If the weather is not warm and dry, vines grow slow and plants tend to fall prey to disease. Wait to direct sow or transplant until soil warms. For best germination, keep the soil lightly moist but not too wet.
TO DIRECT SOW: We recommend raised beds. They improve drainage, warm up earlier, and increase the root zone depth. Space the groups about 3-4 feet apart in all directions. Under each group of seeds, work 1/2-1 cup of our complete fertilizer into the soil. After the seed is up and growing, thin plants.
FOR TRANSPLANTS: Not recommended, but in short-season climates, starting seed indoors may be necessary. Cucumber transplants don't like their roots disturbed, so start them in individual 3 1/2 inch peat pots. Fill pots with a sterile seedling mix. After they've emerged, place the seedlings in a sunny, warm spot. They should only be about 3 weeks old when transplanted in the garden. Harden off about a week in a cold frame if you have one. The entire peat pot can be planted making sure the entire rim is below the soil line. If any part is above ground, it will wick moisture away from the roots and weaken plants. Space and fertilize as described above for direct sowing.
MULCHES & PLANT COVERS: These materials have proven to help plants grow faster, flower sooner, and yield more fruit. We recommend green or silver mulch, plus a floating row cover of Grow Guard 20 or Reemay early in the season to achieve these results.
DISEASE: Where disease is a known problem, choose resistant varieties. Remove plant refuse and control insect pests. Consult your local county extension agent for disease specifics.
INSECTS/PESTS: Control striped and spotted cucumber beetles with Pyrethrin; apply regularly as long as beetles are evident. They primarily infect plants with bacterial wilt disease, which is devastating to plants. Keep border areas of the garden mowed.
HARVEST: Keep your cucumbers picked, and they'll keep producing. When stored at 40°F and 95% relative humidity, they may last up to 3 weeks. Chickens like big cucumbers.
SEED SPECS: Minimum germination standard: 80%. Days to maturity are calculated from the date of direct seeding. Usual seed life: 3 years.

KEY TO FLOWERS AND FRUIT SET
GY....Gynoecious - Has all female flowers.
HE....Hermaphrodite - Flowers contain both male and female reproductive parts.
MO....Monoecious - Has separate male and female flowers on the same plant.
PAT...Parthenocarpic - Has the ability to set fruit without pollination. Triggered by low temperatures, short day length, and plant age.
KEY TO CUCUMBER DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
A.........Anthracnose
ALS....Angular Leaf Spot
B.........Bacterial Wilt
CMV...Cucumber Mosaic Virus
DM......Downy Mildew
PM......Powdery Mildew
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Best Pickling Cucumber Ever
Nov 21, 2013  |  By Peggy
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This was my first year to raise Wautoma cukes and what a pickling year I had! Even when I had to neglect my garden, these vines produced until frost! Seeds are always small and flesh is firm even when skin starts yellowing. A dream of a pickle!
Outstanding Pickling Cuke!
Jul 30, 2013  |  By Alice
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I have grown my own pickling cucumbers for many many years, but never one that grew this vigorously or productively. Its vines are currently near 8' up my deer fence and it is loaded with flowers and fruit. Cukes picked so far have been beautiful and consistent. I can't imagine that it won't make excellent pickles.